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Young Men Lesson 40: The House of the Lord

Manual 1; Excerpt from "The Holy Temple - A Beacon to the World," by Thomas S. Monson

September 28, 2012

Photo by Kaela Worthen.

"The all-important and crowning blessings of membership in the Church are those blessings which we receive in the temples of God." -Thomas S. Monson

Discussion Questions
• What would you say to another Latter-day Saint youth who is not sure that a temple marriage is important?
• How can temple attendance strengthen you to withstand temptations?
• Why is it important to be temple worthy even if you do not have the opportunity to attend the temple frequently?

Share the following story, as told by President Monson. Excerpt from "The Holy Temple - a Beacon to the World," by President Thomas S. Monson, April 2011 General Conference:

May I share with you the account of Tihi and Tararaina Mou Tham and their 10 children. The entire family except for one daughter joined the Church in the early 1960s, when missionaries came to their island, located about 100 miles (160 km) south of Tahiti. Soon they began to desire the blessings of an eternal family sealing in the temple.

At that time the nearest temple to the Mou Tham family was the Hamilton New Zealand Temple, more than 2,500 miles (4,000 km) to the southwest, accessible only by expensive airplane travel. The large Mou Tham family, which eked out a meager living on a small plantation, had no money for airplane fare, nor was there any opportunity for employment on their Pacific island. So Brother Mou Tham and his son Gérard made the difficult decision to travel 3,000 miles (4,800 km) to work in New Caledonia, where another son was already employed.

The three Mou Tham men labored for four years. Brother Mou Tham alone returned home only once during that time, for the marriage of a daughter.

After four years, Brother Mou Tham and his sons had saved enough money to take the family to the New Zealand Temple. All who were members went except for one daughter, who was expecting a baby. They were sealed for time and eternity, an indescribable and joyful experience.

Brother Mou Tham returned from the temple directly to New Caledonia, where he worked for two more years to pay for the passage of the one daughter who had not been at the temple with them—a married daughter and her child and husband.

In their later years Brother and Sister Mou Tham desired to serve in the temple. By that time the Papeete Tahiti Temple had been constructed and dedicated, and they served four missions there.3

My brothers and sisters, temples are more than stone and mortar. They are filled with faith and fasting. They are built of trials and testimonies. They are sanctified by sacrifice and service.

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